voting, and voter fraud …

I just voted early in the recalled Senate election in Western Australia. I asked the official if he had heard about this: Massive Voter Fraud Discovered in North Carolina’s 2012 Election

The North Carolina State Board of Elections has found thousands of instances of voter fraud in the state, thanks to a 28-state crosscheck of voter rolls. Initial findings suggest widespread election fraud.

  • 765 voters with an exact match of first and last name, DOB and last four digits of SSN were registered in N.C. and another state and voted in N.C. and the other state in the 2012 general election.
  • 35,750 voters with the same first and last name and DOB were registered in N.C. and another state and voted in both states in the 2012 general election.
  • 155,692 voters with the same first and last name, DOB and last four digits of SSN were registered in N.C. and another state – and the latest date of registration or voter activity did not take place within N.C.

The second point is key, as double voting is election fraud under state and federal statutes. Punishment for double voting in federal elections can include jail time.

He hadn’t heard, but he was checking names on a computer, and asking for a home address before I was given a ballot, which is good. They haven’t done that before.

I voted for the party of Barnaby Joyce, The Nationals. Poll: Who will you vote for in the re-run WA senate election this weekend?

On the stump in the Nationals‘ interest

Joyce:

“The Nationals also allow the greatest expression of freedom in the Senate. When was the last time a Green, the apparently wild expression of the freedom of youth, did anything apart from voting according to the wishes of their party machine. No Green has ever broken from the party line in my time in politics, which means they are remarkably homogeneous or they have been sat on by the party organisation. What this means is that no matter how worthwhile your plight or how good your argument is, they Greens will never cross the floor to help.”

Heh:No Country For Young Men

by Richard Fernandez  The Left’s biggest lie is that it represents the young; it really represents the very old.

Joyce, continues:

One of the greatest mistakes you can make after being on the road for an extended period, if you’re planning to spend some time with your family, is to drop briefly into your office.

Once you walk into the office, a sea of issues awaits you. The letter that starts reasonably then ends in personal abuse … why the writers leave their phone numbers one can only ponder. “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.”

Or so I believe Plato said.

As a member of parliament, every time you travel to one place you receive a request as to why you are not somewhere else. Once you are a minister that area grows from your electorate to your country. There is always a stack of issues that rest on your desk and the capacity to deal with those that are away from the top of the pile is difficult.

But nothing of a substantive legislative form can be delivered unless you can organise a majority of votes in the House of Representatives and the Senate. For this reason it has been of vital importance that the Nationals give their best endeavours towards winning a Senate spot in the Senate rerun in Western Australia.

As a party that does not have the resources of the major parties, or the Greens, or the personal wealth of Clive, it is hard to muscle in to the media. But you cannot leave your candidate swinging in the breeze so I have tried, with limited success, to get Shane Van Styn, who leads the Nationals’ Senate ticket in Box B, as much coverage as I can muster. It is disappointing when the Nationals, who polled more than Clive’s party at the previous election, are summarily dismissed. From my meagre observations it will be a poor outcome for WA if we cannot muster one office (there are six offices) that would be based away from Perth. It is a big state, WA, and one should spread the legislative resources more evenly across the state or else it becomes the city of Perth rather than the state of Western Australia that is represented in the Senate, which is the house of the states.

Shane Van Styn, an accountant, who was born in Gosnells in the southern suburbs of Perth and now lives in Geraldton, is the Nationals’ most likely chance to gain a regional Senate office for WA. But Clive Palmer appears to be the Phil Spectre of politics, creating the “wall of noise”, and I am trying to get the National Party piccolo heard over this cacophony of craziness. So let us do a deal: let Perth have five out of the six senate offices but let’s see if we can get one office to represent Western Australians outside the city.

The mystery always is how many votes the political horse whisperer can hand to the Lower Callithumpian Golf Party led by a man in a tent from the Blue Mountains west of Sydney. The ideal candidate to hand the balance of power to while they represent the people of Western Australia.

My passion to get a Western Australian Senate candidate up is no doubt affected by the fact that the Nationals started in Western Australia more than a hundred years ago. Our Liberal colleagues started in Victoria, Labor in Queensland, the Greens in Tasmania and the Palmer United Party started in Clive Palmer’s head. The Nationals also allow the greatest expression of freedom in the Senate. When was the last time a Green, the apparently wild expression of the freedom of youth, did anything apart from voting according to the wishes of their party machine. No Green has ever broken from the party line in my time in politics, which means they are remarkably homogeneous or they have been sat on by the party organisation. What this means is that no matter how worthwhile your plight or how good your argument is, they Greens will never cross the floor to help.

Saturday night will come and the nation’s largest byelection will come to a close. One of the great intrigues – what sells in a saturated and tired political market – will be answered and I hope a low-cost, high-effort National Party campaign yields a Senate seat.

Barnaby Joyce is the Minister for Agriculture and the deputy leader of the National Party. 

 

About Tom Harley

Amateur ecologist and horticulturalist and CEO of Kimberley Environmental Horticulture Inc. (Tom Harley)
This entry was posted in comedy, media, Oz politics and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: