much more CO2 doubles crop yields …

More concentrated use of that super plant food is producing fantastic increases in major crops around the globe. Additional atmospheric CO2 is doubling the bio-mass of some crops like sunflower and wheat, and improving germination rates of others, such as rice. All the while, getting by with less water.

Benefits of Atmospheric CO2 Enrichment on Sunflower — Summary (4 November 2015)
The common sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is a large annual forb of the genus Helianthus. As one of the top 35 crops in terms of global food production, it is important to understand how this important agricultural species will respond to increases in the air’s CO2 content. This summary reviews the results of several important studies evaluating the impacts of elevated CO2 and other growth-related variables on sunflower plants…

Will Rising Atmospheric CO2 Reduce the Germination Rate of Rice Seeds? (4 November 2015)
The authors of this paper hypothesized that it would, but the evidence from their experiment reveals the growth enhancing benefits of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on rice yields will continue into the future, as seeds from today’s cultivars germinate and sprout anew — without detriment — into the harvests of tomorrow…

 

The folly of using CO2 as the Green Blob’s reason to fleece taxpayers is rapidly coming undone.

With 300ppm extra CO2, sunflowers show a doubling of biomass:

Pal et al. (2014)

Shoot biomass of the DRSH 1 variety of well-watered and adequately-fertilized plants grown from seed to maturity out-of-doors on a sandy loam soil within open-top chambers
102%

 

 

Pal et al. (2014)

Shoot biomass of the DRSF 113 variety of well-watered and adequately-fertilized plants grown from seed to maturity out-of-doors on a sandy loam soil within open-top chambers
114%

Wheat crops also receive a big boost too: Interactive Effects of Elevated CO2 and Air Pollution on Wheat — Summary (21 October 2015)
Atmospheric CO2 enrichment typically enhances photosynthesis and biomass production in wheat (Triticum aestivum) under normal growing conditions. But what happens when environmental conditions are less than ideal? This Summary investigates this question as it pertains to the impact of air pollutants on the growth and development of wheat, as learned from a number of scientific studies published on this topic…

Rice is also a major beneficiary of expanded CO2 production: […] And because seed germination “is an essential aspect of crop establishment,” as characterized by Chen et al., it would appear that the growth-enhancing benefits of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on rice yields will continue into the future, as seeds from today’s cultivars germinate and sprout anew — without detriment — into the harvests of tomorrow.

With an extra 300ppm of CO2, more than doubling of biomass in this trial:

De Costa et al. (2007)

Grain yield biomass of 16 different genotypes of rice grown in open-top chambers under standard lowland paddy culture with adequate water and nutrients at the Rice Research and Development Institute in Sri Lanka from May to August (yala season)
128%

About Tom Harley

Amateur ecologist and horticulturalist and CEO of Kimberley Environmental Horticulture Inc. (Tom Harley)
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One Response to much more CO2 doubles crop yields …

  1. Pingback: celebrating increased CO2 … | pindanpost

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